Press release

03.04.2020

Intensive care building for COVID-19 patients unveiled

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Charité Campus-Klinik adds 135 intensive care beds

Berlin’s Governing Mayor, Michael Müller (2nd from left), during a visit to the new intensive care building,Intensive care bed with ventilator for critical COVID-19 patients at Charité Campus-Klinik, photo: Gudath/Charité
Berlin’s Governing Mayor, Michael Müller (2nd from left), during a visit to the new intensive care building,Intensive care bed with ventilator for critical COVID-19 patients at Charité Campus-Klinik, photo: Gudath/Charité
Intensive care bed with ventilator for critical COVID-19 patients at Charité Campus-Klinik, photo: Gudath/Charité
Intensive care bed with ventilator for critical COVID-19 patients at Charité Campus-Klinik, photo: Gudath/Charité

CharitéUniversitätsmedizin Berlin has today unveiled its new intensive care building for patients with COVID-19. The now repurposed Charité Campus-Klinik (CCK) will offer 135 intensive care beds, all of which are equipped with ventilators. Michael Müller, Governing Mayor of Berlin and Chair of Charité’s Supervisory Board, visited the building to find out what is being done to prepare for the expected increase in COVID-19 patients.

Charité’s step-by-step increase in intensive care capacity at the CCK guarantees the strict physical segregation of infected and non-infected patients. It also ensures that Charité will be able to meet the needs of COVID-19 patients even once case numbers start to increase. Thanks to the CCK beds, Charité’s overall capacity of intensive care beds will be increased from 364 today to 499.

From the very beginning, Charité has been committed to actively containing the current pandemic. In early March, Charité launched Berlin’s first coronavirus examination unit on Campus Virchow-Klinikum. Intended to inspire others to follow suit, the unit has since welcomed a total of 120 to 150 persons a day. In addition to providing specialist advice, the unit also triages for testing in accordance with official selection criteria. The unit is complemented by Charité’s CovApp and its coronavirus video consultation service. Charité also launched further examination units on its three clinical campuses for use by members of staff.

Michael Müller, Governing Mayor of Berlin and Chair of Charité’s Supervisory Board, explains: “I was very impressed today by how quickly and professionally Charité has been able to ramp up its capacities for coronavirus patients. Charité responded promptly and effectively. All of the technology and equipment needed for the treatment and ventilation of critical coronavirus patients is here and ready. I am immensely grateful to the entire team at Charité, including those working in the background, for making this possible.”

“One important role Charité has taken on is that of Berlin-wide coordinator for the allocation of intensive care beds using the ‘SAVE’ concept. As part of this initiative, we are also involved in the remote care of intensive care patients at other hospitals,” says Prof. Dr. Heyo K. Kroemer, Charité Chief Executive Officer. This telemedicine-based intervention replicates the concept of the Innovation Fund-funded ERIC (Enhanced Recovery after Intensive Care) project.

Prof. Dr. Ulrich Frei, Charité’s Chief Medical Officer, adds: “Medically speaking, the treatment of critically ill and ventilated COVID-19 patients is complex and challenging. This remote care concept enables our intensive care physicians and specialist nursing staff to use telemedicine-based solutions to support and provide expert consultations to other hospitals.” Efforts are currently underway to expand the existing network of eleven hospitals within the Berlin-Brandenburg region. This will give a total of 30 hospitals access to this network and Charité’s services.

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Contact

Manuela Zingl

Corporate Spokesperson
CharitéUniversitätsmedizin Berlin
t: +49 30 450 570 400



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